Sunday Times bury wind farm survey after it reveals majority support

The Sunday Times has attempted to bury a survey it commissioned on wind farms after the results did not correspond with its editorial stance. A poll for the newspaper conducted by YouGov revealed that that 56% of those surveyed thought that the government should increase use of wind farms — but editors dumped all reference to the survey after they didn’t get the results they wanted.

The front page (£) and the leader column (£) of yesterday’s paper took a staunch anti-wind farm line, talking about “our reckless folly in erecting tens of thousands of wind turbines” and declaring that “For reasons of cost as well as aesthetics, we must avoid falling into that trap”.

Despite its absence from Sunday Times copy, the figures were published by YouGov owing to British Polling Council rules, which state:

“All polls commissioned by national or regional media organisations … must be published in full on the member’s web site within 2 working days of the original release.”

When asked to think “about the country’s future energy provision”, the full breakdown for wind power was as follows:

  • More than at present: 56%
  • Maintain at current levels: 15%
  • Less than at present: 19%
  • Not sure: 9%

Even amongst Conservative voters, there was a majority support for wind power.

7 Comments

  1. Posted December 20, 2011 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    I think this reflects the true position of British voters on renewable energy. They know that the game is up for fossil fuel. It is just a pity that the idiots who run our print media are actually afraid to print objective estimates of public opinion.

  2. Marcus Jones
    Posted December 22, 2011 at 12:29 am | Permalink

    It’s fortunate on this occasion that a democratically provided rule allowed a deceit to be highlighted. The pity is that it needed to, particularly around an issue as globally important as energy. This should stand as yet another confirmation that even well regard media have no conscience in stifling the true sentiment and opinions of the people in this country for reasons of political self interest. It’s perhaps not hard to conceive why there seems mounting protest to capitalist politics through out the civilised world.

  3. Posted December 22, 2011 at 8:21 am | Permalink

    I am totally in favour of wind farms. I think they are aesthetically beautiful anyway. They stand tall and proud. They provide free energy for our children’s future. Spend on wind farms and not on weapons and armaments and drones I say. Weapons and armaments and drones are what need to be buried.

  4. Fred
    Posted December 29, 2011 at 2:01 pm | Permalink

    I’m not surprised, the UK’s leading sceptics on Climate Change, Lord Lawson and Lord Chris Monkton are related by marriage via their children, one of them being a chief correspondent of the Sunday Times. Go figure, hardly free press?

  5. Posted December 30, 2011 at 10:39 pm | Permalink

    While this is interesting, I can’t say I blame the Times for not publicising this – why would you ?

    It’s no different to when Michael Foot’s spin doctors advised him to steer clear of talking about Unilateral Nuclear Disarmament in his election campaign.

    Mind you, it never stopped him.

  6. Posted February 12, 2012 at 11:26 am | Permalink

    If you were to install 80,000 large wind turbines in the uk , you could not shut down even one conventional fossil fuel or nuclear power plant . Germany spain portugal and denmark already have huge wind capacity and there is on reduction. Public poles of opinion do not effect that scientific fact . Wind power is always a passenger ( a feel good investment ). Unfortunate but true . Val martin drumsallagh kingscourt co cavan ireland

  7. J Taylor
    Posted February 22, 2012 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

    Near us we have one of Europes largest wind farms.
    Allegedly able to generate 324Mw. It covers 35 sq kms. During the a cold spell of several weeks in 2010, a high pressure time, its peak generation was 10,000watts 5 (FIVE) kettles.
    It can be seen for miles. Actual AVERAGE performance abot 22%, about 75 mw.
    Not far away was the Hunterston A reactor, a 1950`s design rated at 300 mw. This delivered average 95% power over its lifetime, about 280 mw
    To “deliver” even Scotland`s requirements would take an area the size of Renfrewshire to be obliterated under propellors at what a cost visually and as consumers, (but not landowners or foreign operators)

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