It doesn’t take a particularly long memory to recall a time when the SNP opposed devolution. Indeed it was only after their poor showing in the 1997 UK General Election that they changed their tune and decide to support devolution for Scotland, as a stepping stone towards independence.

Today the SNP are about to take a step back towards their fundamentalist past by voting AGAINST more powers for the Scottish Parliament. The Scotland Bill, a product of the Calman Commission, looks set to receive cross-party support however the SNP are the only party to table a motion against the bill stating that they regard “the Bill as a whole to be unacceptable”.

As the honourable member for Glasgow Central put it:

“Who would have thought we’d see a Tory backbencher speaking in favour of more powers for Scotland and the SNP voting against it?!”

Quite.

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  3. “It doesn’t take a particularly long memory to recall a time when the SNP opposed devolution.”

    It wouldn’t require a long memory so much as false memory syndrome. I presume you’re referring to the fact that the SNP played their cards close to their chest before coming out for a Yes vote in 1997, but in the real world there was never the slightest question of them doing anything else. In his 1995 debate with George Robertson, for instance, Alex Salmond was asked how he would rank the three constitutional options in a multi-option referendum, and he confirmed he would rank devolution second after independence. And are you forgetting about the SNP moving heaven and earth in the 70s to try to get devolution onto the statute book, in the teeth of opposition from wreckers on the Labour backbenches, not to mention the Liberals’ decision to help kill the original Scotland and Wales Bill by supporting a guillotine motion?

    So, sorry, but it’s a matter of historical record that the sentence “it was only after their poor showing in the 1997 UK General Election that they changed their tune” is a load of tripe. I look forward eagerly to the correction.

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